Arthritis and Weight

I’m in pain. Every day. Between joints that don’t stay in place and the ostearthritis affecting several of my joints, running, high impact exericse, and even going down the stairs have all become unpleasant activities in the last few years. Unfortunately, there’s nothing I can do about the arthritis. But there is something I can do to hopefully lessen the symptoms.

Continue reading “Arthritis and Weight”

How to Create a Budget that Works for You

I’ve done a few things with my family that have left some people puzzled about our socioeconomic status. How can we afford to do all the travelling we do? We’re not rich by any means. We’re just good planners, and we happen not to care what other people think about our lifestyle. If you want to be able to afford those extra experiences you’ve been dreaming of, you’ll need too learn how to create a budget that works for you—and then stick to it.

Continue reading “How to Create a Budget that Works for You”

Books & Gratitude

Gratitude and books… gratitude for books… week in review.

A couple of years ago I thought I’d write down everything I was thankful for on a daily basis. I was inspired by The Book of Awesome, which really is awesome, to recognize all the great things in my life. While I do still feel grateful for a lot in my life, the habit of writing it down has been lost along the way. I’m starting over, though I’m being more realistic this time. Rather than writing it every day, I’m going to be writing it once per week.

Continue reading “Books & Gratitude”

Homeschooling: Teaching Kids About Money

I’m starting (perhaps a wee bit late) to prep our homeschool lessons for the upcoming school year. First things first: I must remember to send our letter of intent this year. Second things second, I like creating my own curriculum, as that was my favourite thing when I was still a school teacher. Creating lesson plans is definitely part of the fun of teaching for me. I figured I might as well share my curriculum with you guys! This year, I’m doing a “home economics” curriculum, and one of its main features will be teaching kids about money management.

Continue reading “Homeschooling: Teaching Kids About Money”

Getting back into Exercise

Trying to get back into a regular exercise routine has been frustrating, to put it mildly. During our RV adventure, I did a fair bit of hiking, but not nearly as much exercise (and not nearly as high-intensity) as in my triathlon days. I’ve given up a lot of the physical activities I love over the last few years, and getting back into exercise hasn’t been an easy journey.

Continue reading “Getting back into Exercise”

Preparing for Cycle Touring with Kids

Cycle Touring with Kids is a blast. It’s fun, it’s challenging, and it changes your perspective on family travel.

If you’ve been following this blog a while, you know we’ve recently come back from a 9-month RV adventure with our three kids, now ages 9, 7, and 5.  But this wasn’t our first family adventure. When the kids were 6, 4, and 2, we took off for a 567-kilometer cycle adventure from Kingston, Ontario, to London, Ontario, where my parents and brother & family live.

Continue reading “Preparing for Cycle Touring with Kids”

Homeschooling: Brazilian Heritage Lessons

Teaching Brazilian Culture & Heritage (or not)

One of the expectations of the Ontario Elementary Curriculum in almost every grade is that children be made aware of their heritage and be encouraged in their traditions. Let me be honest: as an immigrant, homeschooling mother, I’ve been doing a terrible job of this.

Continue reading “Homeschooling: Brazilian Heritage Lessons”

10 Essentials for Travelling with Children

If you’ve been following this blog a while, you know that our family loves to travel. Whether it’s hopping on a bicycle for an adventure, or travelling all over Canada and the US in an RV, I know I’m happiest when I’m discovering the world with my husband and children.

Continue reading “10 Essentials for Travelling with Children”

Stop Comparing: You’re Good Enough As You Are

I’ve been having a hard time lately, comparing myself with people two to three decades older than me. On days when my pain is especially bad and my joints aren’t cooperating, it’s hard to see a 60-year-old who can move better than me. On days when I compare myself to people like this, I tend to get depressed. And therein lies the problem: we have to stop comparing, because wherever we are, we are good enough.

Continue reading “Stop Comparing: You’re Good Enough As You Are”