Vegan Red Lentil Soup

A delicious vegan soup even veggie snobs will love

My son is a very particular eater. There is very little he is happy to eat, and  he does justice to his Italian name: carbs, carbs, and more carbs, please. Give him pasta and fruit and he’s happy. But there is one thing I make that he eats and asks for more. The best part? It’s healthy, delicious, and vegan to boot. And the rest of the family loves it, too. This Vegan Red Lentil Soup freezes well and is a great thing to pull out of the freezer on a busy night to save your money and your time.

Let it be known that I’m not a vegan (I’m not even a bona-fide vegetarian), but I do enjoy making high-iron, high-protein vegan meals frequently, because they’re healthy, keep well, and are often super tasty.

Red Lentil Soup: vegan, nutritious, and delicious, www.marianamcdougall.com.

I started making red lentil soup from a recipe in a cookbook, but over the years I have changed this soup so much and added so much to it, that now mine is a recipe in its own right. So here I give you the instructions for a delicious meal that will please even the most avid meat lovers. Oh, the photos of the soup are from a Creative Commons site and not of my actual soup, because kids. I guarantee that though my soup looks nowhere near as pretty, it tastes just as delicious as the ones on the photos look.

Vegan Red Lentil Soup

Ingredients:

2 tbsp canola (or other cooking oil)

1 yellow onion, diced

4 cloves garlic, diced

1/4 tsp cumin

1/4 tsp ground ginger (or 1/2 tsp fresh ginger)

Dash cayenne pepper

4 large carrots, peeled and diced

2 celery sticks, diced

1 can diced tomatoes (8 fluid ounces)

1 cup quinoa, rinsed

2 cups red lentils, rinsed

6-8 cups vegetable broth (more broth if you prefer a more watery soup, less broth if you prefer a thicker soup).

Salt to taste

Method:

Heat the oil in a large stock pot over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, cumin, ginger, and cayenne pepper, and sauté until fragrant, about 2- minutes. Add the carrots and celery and mix to coat with the spices. If the onions and garlic are starting to stick to the bottom of the pot, add a splash of veggie broth or water. 

Cook the carrots and celery until they start to soften, about 5 minutes. Add the diced tomatoes, quinoa, and red lentils and stir to combine. Cook for another minute or so, and then add the veggie broth.

Cook, uncovered, and mixing occasionally, for about 15-20 minutes, until the lentils and quinoa are soft. If the soup starts to boil before the 15-minute mark, be sure to lower the heat until the quinoa and lentils are cooked through. Do a taste test and add any more spices and/or salt to your liking.

Take about half the soup and place it into a high-powered blender. Blend the soup, then add it back to the pot and mix together. The result will be a deliciously creamy, orange-coloured soup that’s sure to be a crowd pleaser.

Enjoy!

 

Vegetarian Diets: Should You Be a Vegetarian?

Should you be a vegetarian?

Like everything else in nutrition, the answer isn’t simple. A lot of factors go into deciding on a lifestyle diet change: your beliefs around nutrition, scientific research, how your body reacts to foods, allergy considerations, and moral dilemmas. At the end of the day, only you can decide what to eat, and it’s no one else’s business what you put in your mouth (unless they’re feeding you, of course. Then they kind of need to know what you’ll eat). Here’s my story.

Continue reading “Vegetarian Diets: Should You Be a Vegetarian?”

Raw Kale Salad Recipe

Kale is the poster vegetable for healthy eating these days, and no wonder—a mere 100 grams provides nearly 200% of your daily recommended intake of Vitamin A, 100% of your daily intake of Vitamin C, 15% calcium, 8% iron, 15% Vitamin B-6, and 11% magnesium. Oh, it happens to be delicious, too, if you prepare it right. What’s not to like?

Here’s a great kale salad recipe that has become a staple in our household. Pretty much any time we want salad, this comes out. My kids even eat it!

Continue reading “Raw Kale Salad Recipe”

High Protein, High Iron Peanut Butter Pancakes

Everybody asks you where you get your protein if you’re a vegetarian. It’s a really silly question, since protein is in everything, and if you eat a varied enough diet, even without meat, you’ll be just fine. It’s also a silly question because what most vegetarians might be lacking, if they’re lacking anything, is iron, not protein.

I was a vegetarian for 4 years without any issue. But during my last two pregnancies, I was anemic. Since my last pregnancy, it’s been very difficult to raise my iron. To try to avoid supplements, I’m trying to raise the iron in my blood by tweaking my diet. For now, I still have to take iron tablets, but the hope is that if I’m good with planning what I eat, I’ll be able to go off them eventually.

This breakfast is one of the ways you can wake up to an iron boost (and it’s a high protein breakfast, too!)

Continue reading “High Protein, High Iron Peanut Butter Pancakes”

Meal Planning Helps You Save Money, Time, and Sanity – and It’s Healthy, Too!

Meal Planning is one of the best ways to maintain a healthy diet (and save your sanity). It also happens to save money and waste, too. What’s not to like?

This post may contain affiliate links. This means that if you purchase something after following a link on this post, I may receive a small commission. Rest assured that I only recommend products and services that I use and love, or that I want to use in the near future.

In the interest of reaching the best health of my life, I’m done with eating cereal for dinner (OK, maybe I’ll still do that sometimes) and arriving at dinner time frazzled because I don’t know what I’m going to make today.

So, for the next few weeks, I’ll be creating meal plans, and I hope you join me in trying to do some meal planning of your own.

Continue reading “Meal Planning Helps You Save Money, Time, and Sanity – and It’s Healthy, Too!”